orange

Orange

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Category : Fruits

A POWER HOUSE OF NUTRIENTS

The word orange is derived from Sanskrit narangah “orange tree.” Th e Sanskrit word is in turn borrowed from the Dravidian root for ‘fragrant’.

cartoon-orange-17963115An orange is the citrus fruit. It is the most commonly grown tree fruit in the world.Oranges are widely grown in warm climates worldwide, and the flavours of oranges vary from sweet to sour. Th e fruit is commonly peeled and eaten fresh, or squeezed for its juice. It has a thick bitter rind that is usually discarded, but can be processed into animal feed by removal of water, using pressure and heat. It is also used in certain recipes as flavoring or a garnish. The outer-most layer of the rind can be grated or thinly veneered with a tool called a zester, to produce orange zest. Zest is popular in cooking because it contains the oil glands and has a strong flavor similar to the fleshy inner part of the orange. The white part of the rind, called the pericarp or albedo and including the pith, is a source of pectin and has nearly the same amount of vitamin C as the fl esh.

Climate
Oranges can be grown outdoors in warmer climates, and indoors in cooler climates. Like most citrus plants, oranges will not do well unless kept between 15.5 °C – 29 °C (60 °F – 85 °F). Orange trees grown from the seeds of a store-bought fruit may not produce fruit, and any fruit that is produced may be different than the parent fruit, due to modern techniques of hybridization. To grow the seed of a store-bought orange, one must not let the seed dry out (an approach used for many citrus plants). One method is to put the seeds between the halves of a damp paper towel until they germinate, and then plant them. Many just plant them straight into the soil, making sure to water them regularly. Oranges require a huge amount of water. Storage and processing

After harvesting, oranges have a shelf life of about one week at room temperature and one month refrigerated. In either case, they are optimally stored loosely in an open or perforated plastic bag. Oranges produce odours that are absorbed by meat, eggs and dairy products.

Nutritional value

Orange, Nutritional value per 100g (3.5 oz)
Energy 192 kJ (46 kcal)
Carbohydrates 11.54 g
Sugars 9.14 g
Dietary fiber 2.4 g
Fat 0.21 g
Protein 0.70 g

Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.100 mg (9%)
Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.040 mg (3%)
Niacin (vit. B3) 0.400 mg (3%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.250 mg (5%
Vitamin B6 0.051 mg (4%)


Products made from orangesorange

  • Orange Juice-It is made by squeezing the fruit on a special instrument called a “juicer” or a “squeezer.” The juice is collected in a small tray underneath. This is mainly done in the home, and in industry is done on a much larger scale. Frozen orange juice concentrate is made from freshly squeezed and filtered orange juice.
  • Sweet orange oil is byproduct of the juice industry produced by pressing the peel. It is used as a flavoring of food and drink and for its fragrance in perfume and aromatherapy. Sweet orange oil consists of about 90% -limousine, a solvent used in various household chemicals, such as to condition wooden furniture, and along with other citrus oils in grease removal and as a hand-cleansing agent. It is an efficient cleaning agent which is promoted as being environmentally friendly and preferable to petroleum distillates.
  • In Spain, fallen blossoms are dried and then used to make tea.
  • Orange blossom honey,or actually citrus honey, is produced by putting beehives in the citrus groves during bloom, which also pollinates seeded citrus varieties. Orange blossom honey is highly prized, and tastes much like orange.